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Book Review: The Cuban Affair

It has been over two years between Nelson DeMille books, which is way too long. His latest, The Cuban Affair, is classic DeMille with its action packed story, fact based plot, witty characters, and humorous dialogue.

In this, DeMille’s twentieth novel, he has Daniel (Mac) MacCormick adjusting to civilian life. After serving two tours in Afghanistan he has sought out a more peaceful lifestyle in Key West Florida. He is now a charter boat captain of a 42 feet deep-sea fishing vessel, The Maine, which takes tourists and fisherman on excursions. Having made a name for himself and needing his military skills, three Cuban-Americans make him an offer to have the Maine participate in a ten-day fishing tournament to Cuba. But the real reason they need him is to help find and return sixty million dollars left behind by the refugees. The covert plan is to embed Mac and one of the Cuban-Americans, Sara Ortega, into Cuba as part of an educational tour under the auspices of Yale University. The action ratchets up as Mac and Sara are on the run from the Cuban authorities and need his first mate, gruff seventy-year-old Vietnam veteran, Jack Colby, to help in the rescue.

Although not a John Corey novel fans will enjoy the new set of characters created by DeMille. Throughout the years, the male and female leads are smart, brave, self-confident, loyal, smart alecky, and the sarcastic banter between them is classic. His one-liners are the perfect zingers to a conversation that will make readers chuckle. For example, “you are an officer and a gentleman by an act of Congress, but an a—hole by choice,” or “why do you want to go to Cuba. North Korea was sold out.”

The author commented, “Corey is not a kid anymore. Mac is much younger. He is also an Afghanistan veteran while many of the main characters in earlier books were Vietnam vets. Mac is more educated and from a different class than Corey. I did not want to create the same character; although in some ways they have the same personality and dry wit. Another difference is that John Corey lives in law enforcement while Mac lives in the civilian world. John fought terrorists while Mac is apolitical and more cautious.”

Readers of DeMille expect historical facts and details intertwined within the story. In this book it is no different. Having gone to Cuba himself as part of the Yale University-affiliated educational tour he was able to get a personal eye view of what Cuba is really like. He wants readers to be entertained, but also to learn something, especially since many have forgotten about the Castro Brothers’ actions.

He noted, “The system they created does not guarantee property rights. The Cuban regime seized private property and is saying they have no intention of returning Cuban citizens’ property, and we are not pushing them. Most of the people who came to Miami when the Communists seized power left houses, factories, and huge businesses. They want their property back, and that’s going to be a big issue as normalization moves forward. It is a repressive regime with a subjugated population that isolates the people.”

The Cuban Affair is a gripping novel that has relatable and likeable characters. As with all his novels, people will be immersed in the setting, culture, and history. Hopefully this will be the first in a series of books involving these characters that will include plenty of action, political intrigue, romance and dry wit. 81gFWg3HZXL._AC_UL115_